Wednesday, July 05, 2017

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Post 1562. Wednesday July 5

Friday Fictioneers



What's happening to me. Words once flowed from my mind in an endless stream. Now they don't. I just sit here fiddling with pens, screwing up paper and bending paper clips. We used to go a club on Mondays and sit in a circle reading stories we'd written. Or was that Tuesdays? We did, didn't we? Yes, I remember standing in the centre and reciting a poem. That was me, wasn't it? Or was it you?

It's Thursday tomorrow I think. I hope so because we do something special on Mondays. We go to a club. Don't we? Or is that Fridays? 

Sorry, do I know you?




Thanks to Rochelle for hosting Friday Fictioneers and to Claire Sheldon for the photo.









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54 comments:

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    1. A combination of the two I suspect. Thanks Mrs D

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  2. This sounds terrifying... I have seen it happen to my mother.

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  3. I often forget days and dates. But your tale is terrifying, indeed. Hope he/she has a friend or a family member, he/she can count on.

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    1. I would like to think so. Thanks for dropping by moon.

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  4. I often wonder .... do I forget because I am old or is it because often I am not interested.
    Loved your take on this one.

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    1. I often ask myself the same question! Thanks so much.

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  5. I hate dementia, mainly because I have to watch my Mom slowly lose her memories.

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  6. This was beautiful. The point at which memories start to blur. Very moving writing, Keith. Cheers, Varad

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    1. There but for the grace.... Thanks Varad

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  7. Yesterday was a holiday. Today seems like Monday--the second one this week. Sometimes the days get away from me too. My father had dementia. He could care less what day of week it was.

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    1. You and me too! I guess your father was blisssfully unaware of what others saw as a problem. Cheers Russell

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  8. Dear Keith,

    Funny and sad all at the same time. Wonderfully written.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    https://rochellewisoff.com/2017/07/05/7-july-2017/

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  9. Beautifully done, Keith, funny and tragic.

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  10. Once I retired I stopped worrying what day it was. I just keel a couple of atomic clocks around.

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    1. Haha! Once retired it doesn't matter anymore. Cheers Denise

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  11. that's sad... sadder still for those who know her.

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  12. So hard on the others... once the memory is totally gone. It's the in-between that shares the bejeezus out of me. And must be so very frustrating for the one suffering the memory lapses...

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    1. Very good point Dale. Thanks for dropping by.

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  13. I forget the date when I have to fill forms but cellphone becomes handy.It is tough when losing memory starts with advancing age. I have seen my aunt suffer and her caregivers too.

    http://ideasolsi65.blogspot.in/2017/07/thank-you-claire-sheldon-for.html

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    1. Gladly I've not witnessed it in those around me. I only hope it stays that way.

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  14. Hi Keith!
    I hope you are doing okay. I hope this makes you feel better - I have nominated you for the Mystery Blogger Award https://akprowling.wordpress.com/2017/07/05/i-won-an-award/

    Take care!

    Love,
    Anjali

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  15. I feel like that all the time! :D

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  16. Onset of dementia, or could thus just be depression?

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    1. I'm leaving it to the reader to interpret it as they wish. Thanks Reena

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  17. That's very sad. I hope his friends still visit him and take him to the club, even if he can't always remember.

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    1. I'd like to think so. Cheers Alistair

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  18. The voice in this was very good. Not self pitying, just puzzled, questioning. Excellent! And the repetition worked really well, going full circle like that.

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    1. Thanks Sandra. That is how I visualised the character. Thanks for your kind words.

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  19. I remember laughing about forgetfulness not so long ago, now it is just plain scary.

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  20. This is really good! I feel this same way so many times. People say "It's just our age. I forget too," but I'm not totally reassured. I still think the chemo last year punched holes in my brain.😥

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    1. Thanks so much. I hear that often myself!

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  21. I think this is pretty much one of the most terrifying events I could imagine. You've written it out well.

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  22. Sad...but so true to life.

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  23. I feel for Swallow. That's tough. My partner, whose memory has declined, also thinks open heart surgery took some IQ points. Hard to say. But I got griped at for saying "I told you already" one too many times. ~hangs head~ It's frustrating on both sides. I can only hope not to go this route. Well done! You really got us readers thinking.

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    1. It must be so difficult, I can only imagine. Writing on a subject I've never encountered was a bit of a gamble. Thanks Darla

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  24. I forget things sometimes but the information comes back later. That's old age not Alzheimer's. I know because my mother had Alzheimer's and things didn't come back. Not many knew about Alzheimer's when my mother began to be effected. It was a slow process and I don't think she realized what was happening. It must be terrifying for some people who are fully aware what's happening. Good writing, Keith. ---- Suzanne

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    1. I know excatly what you mean. I do get very frustrated when I forget thingsthat I shouldn't, but I always remember minutes later - although sometimes with the help of Google! Thanks so much Suzanne

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  25. This is sad and frightening. You describe the confusion so well. And the greatest pain, only mentioned briefly, is the loss of creativity.

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    1. To me that is probably the scariest part. Thanks for dropping by.

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  26. Oh dear! Reading this after a weekend with my elderly OH and even more elderly mother is far too close to the truth.

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  27. Wonderfully written, Keith. A beautiful mix of humour and sadness.

    https://kittysverses.wordpress.com/2017/07/12/a-matter-of-fact
    kittysverses

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